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1 Samuel 25 Condensed Version

Samuel dies
People mourn
David moves
To Maon
Nabal’s mean
Got lots of food
Abby’s nice
And in a good mood
David sends
Ten men to Nabal
They ask for food
Instead get shoed

David hears
Of this let-down
Sharpens his sword
To kill this clown
Abby hurries
To gather food
Before Dave kills
Any of Nabal’s dudes
Abby falls
At David’s feet
And pleads for peace
Pleads for peace

David puts
His sword down
Abby’s courage
Deserves a crown
Nabal parties
All night long
Has a stroke
After dawn
Abby’s a widow
But not for long
Cause Dave likes Abby
They marry and are happy

-by Jesse Joyner

West Palm Beach

Sarah and I are enjoying some down time in West Palm Beach right now. I’m juggling at 2 churches while on this trip, but most of our time is spent hanging out in the area. Our primary purpose for coming down was to let Sarah shadow a counselor at a place here in town called the Hippocrates Health Institute. And that is what she is doing from 9am-4pm each day. I’m just relaxing and scoping out the area during the day to plan some nice evening activities with my wife.

We were blessed to find FREE housing through a contact we had at Asbury Seminary. A family is letting us stay in their side apartment (used by the mother-in-law during the winter season). So we have a private bath and private entrance. Last night, Sarah and I got to walk along the boardwalk in West Palm. It is a very pretty ocean city and there at very few visitors and tourists this time of year.

Crossing the bridge over to Palm Beach, you get into the more ritzy part of town. We drove through and saw Beverly Hills style mansions. While driving we got caught behind a man driving a Bently with the top down and a magnicifent black poodle in the passenger seat. He was stroking the poodle’s fur at one of the traffic lights. Welcome to Palm Beach, FL!

We’ll be back in Virginia next Wednesday and we will begin the unpacking process in our new apartment. See you later!

-Jesse

August 2007 Recap

Hey folks, I just finished an August tour that took me from Indiana to Ohio to Missouri to Pennsylvania. I got to minister at a Wesleyan church, an Assemblies of God church, a Baptist church, a Missionary church, and two Salvation Army venues. By the way, the Salvation Army is a church – they are very emphatic about that.

Though I have fun memories from each of the places I went to, I would like to especially share about my trip to Missouri. First of all, it was for a Kid’s Crusade at an Assemblies of God church. I grew up in the A/G denomination, so that brought back some fun memories for me (Royal Rangers and such). While at this church, I met a lovely little girl and her grandmother. The girl was about nine years old and she was blind. The grandmother wanted me to pray for Jesus to heal her eyesight. This girl has been blind since birth and can only see faint representations of light and dark. Nonetheless, she was cheery and joyful in spirit. I stood there at the altar with the request to pray for her – and I did. As far as I can remember, I have never prayed for God to heal the blindness of someone. I had just recently read the story of Jesus healing the man blind from birth. He healed him both physically and spiritually. So I know God can do it.

But this is me being honest here – it is so hard to believe sometimes. Jesus said in the book of John (chapter 14) that we will do even greater things than what He did on earth. What in the world does that mean? Lord, please give us a clearer understanding of these “greater things” and how to pray for healing in your name.

That brings me to the other experiences on my Missouri trip. I got to visit the Harry S. Truman Presidential Library and Museum. That was a really neat tour through history. I learned a great deal about Truman that I did not previously know. I also got to see the grave of he and his wife Bess. I can’t imagine the stress of being the president over both the dropping of the atomic bomb, the founding of the modern state of Israel, and the onset of the Korean war.

Then I spent an afternoon at the International House of Prayer in Kansas City. That was quite the experience. I have been there before, but only briefly. This time, I spent some time in their 24/7 prayer room. This place is incredible. There are people leading prayer and worship around the clock every single day. So I was able to step into a very peaceful place of worship led by some very talented musicians. And the neat thing is that they were not putting on a show or preaching to us. They were just up on the stage singing to God and praying. They were “lead worshippers.” Perhaps the best way to lead worship is simply by example.

That’s it for now. I’ll do another update for September when it rolls around. Sarah and I are moving to Richmond, VA in a week. Then we’ll be in Florida for labor day week. See you soon!

Book Review: The Parable of Joy


The Parable of Joy: Reflections on the Wisdom of the Book of John by Michael Card

I have not yet finished this fine book, but I love it enough to share it as a strong recommendation. I am actually using this as a daily reading in the mornings. Michael Card, the prolific and poetic singer/songwriter, writes this book in the form of a popular commentary on the book of John (in the Bible). Card himself is a Biblical scholar who loves to study and learn about the historical background to Biblical passages. He takes what he has learned about the book of John and presents it in this book.

The book is separated into different sections of the book of John (some short, some longer). Each chapter is a different story/section of John. He begins each chapter with a very readable translation of the text with footnotes that give historical background. Following the translation, Card then gives some paragraphs of prose that explain the meaning of the related passage, either by means of commentary or by means of storytelling as if he were an onlooker during the days of Jesus. I very much enjoy learning from Michael’s wisdom. Now I am a fan both of his music as well as his writing! Get the book someday and enjoy.

Seasoned Storytellers

Storytelling is an art form. And some of the greatest storytellers are the ones who do it naturally, without trying to be an artist at it. This especially includes people from the great generation who were born before World War 2. I spent last evening having dinner with three people from this generation. I believe all three of them were born in the 1930’s. I sat and listened to them tell stories about everything from early telephone technology to the Cuban missile crisis. They told stories with such joy that I was on the edge of my seat at their descriptions of life long ago.

There are a few reasons why their stories are so intriguing. First of all, they are from a very different era of history than myself. They can give first-hand testimony about life back then and very easily take me there in their sincere accounts of what they remember. Since it is their story, they feel the feelings and laugh the laughter all over again of the things that happened to them. Secondly, the stories they told were the ones that stood out among thousands of things that have happened to them over the years. So that means the stories they relate time-tested and worth telling over and over again. Finally, when you are listening to a 75-year old tell you stories, you are listening to someone with 75 years of life wisdom. That alone is worth spending time in their presence.

Though I cannot tell the stories as good as they can, let me give two examples of the things they were telling me. First of all, they told me about early telephones. Apparently, it was a luxury in the 40’s to have a private phone line. They said that many people had what was called a “party line” (I love that title). That means that when you wanted to make a phone call, you would first talk to the operator, then he/she would put you through to the party line. Once you were on the party line, their could have been several other people on the line at the same time, and you would have to wait your turn to say what you had to say to the person you were trying to get a hold of. So, you would hear the business of other people in town. Last night, Al said that when he was younger and on the town party line, there was one lady in town that seemed to always be on the line. I guess some things never change. But back then, if you loved the phone that much, you couldn’t always be private about it!

The other story that stuck out was when Al told me about the time his wife, Joan, had their first child. He was about 22 and she was about 19. They lived in rural Iowa at the time, which was around the mid-50’s. Joan began having labor pains in their trailer out in the country. They had only one neighbor. And this neighbor had the only phone between the two houses. So Al went next door to call the doctor about what to do with Joan’s labor pains. But Al was young and inexperienced in how to deal with a wife with labor pains. So when he arrived at his neighbor’s house, the neighbor (who did not know about Joan’s labor pains) cordially offered Al some coffee and cookies upon arrival. So Al sat down and leisurely had some coffee and cookies before calling the doctor. Then he finally called the doctor. When the doctor heard about the labor pains and how intense they were, he said, “Get her over to the hospital right away.” On the way to the hospital, Al stopped again at a friend’s house and had a turkey sandwich. When they finally arrived at the hospital, Joan’s mother was pacing the hallways, looking for her daughter and ready to kill her son-in-law. Fortunately, she did not kill Al and Joan had her baby. And they will never forget the humor of Al’s inexperience in “husbandry.”

So, go find some wise elderly folks and prompt them to tell you some stories from their past. Keep listening and perhaps you will get caught up in a world you never knew – but one that you can enter into just by listening to some first hand testimony.

Summer Juggling Tour

I write to you from Fort Wayne, Indiana. I am currently at First Missionary Church near the campus of Taylor University Fort Wayne (go Trojans!). I don’t have time to share all my fun experiences at camps and churches this past summer. But I will chronicle the locations in case you care where I was all summer. I’ll give one fun memory from each trip:

June:
Central Florida Nazarene Camp (Lake Placid, FL) – winning the beach limbo contest

Latonia Christian Church (Latonia, KY) – stealing an apple from Roger’s dinner snack

Vineyard Community Church (Lexington, KY) – juggling for my own church and local community

The RISE Program (Bergin, KY) – getting the coolest set of thank-you letters ever

Alive Christian Music Festival (Canal Fulton, OH) – juggling with singer Vicky Beeching

New Life Baptist Church (New Wilmington, PA) – the human table that miserably failed

Camp Hickory (Ingleside, IL) – showing off my toe-touch dive to the kids

July:
Wall Highway Baptist Church Camp (Trenton, GA) – playing Loot with the leaders late at night

Fellowship Community Church (Norwalk, IA) – taking a 40 mile bike ride

The International Juggling Festival (Winston-Salem, NC) – meeting my new friend Daniel and throwing the 5-foot yellow ball at each other at 1am in the gym

Prince Avenue Baptist Church Camp (Helen, GA) – taking my wife, Sarah, to a camp

Vineyard Community Church (Cincinnati, OH) – messing around with Thataway the Clown

August:
First Missionary Church (Fort Wayne, IN) – having a dropless program on the first night

I know all these reflections are simply fun things, but I want it to be known that I got to see God do some amazing things in the lives of children this summer, including many first-time commitments to be followers of Jesus and also prayers against fears and prayers for healing. It is so exciting to be a part of the ever-increasing work of the Kingdom of God. All praise to God on high. Grace and Peace, Jesse.

Book Review: Total Abandon

Book Review: Total Abandon by Gary Witherall and Elizabeth Cody Newenhuyse

This is the gripping story of a modern-day martyred Christian missionary. The martyr is Bonnie Witherall and her widowed husband Gary (who has since remarried) tells the story from his perspective.

The book tracks the life of this young Christian couple from when they met in college at Moody Bible Institute in Chicago. Bonnie was from the Pacific Northwest and Gary is a native of England. They fell in love, felt a call to the mission field and then went to Sidon, Lebanon to work with a Christian clinic for pregnant women among the Palestinian refugee community. Bonnie was brutally murdered at the clinic one morning in 2002. They never found the killer. Gary went through a great deal of trauma (which he chronicles in the book) and now speaks to groups about his experiences. His challenge is to all Christians that following the Great Commission is neither easy nor safe. It requires a total abandon of everything we hold close, dear, and valuable – even the price of our own lives.

I was particularly interested in reading this story not only because I can relate to the feeling of being young and married with an interest in the mission field but also because I once met Gary Witherall at a wedding for my close friend Michael Kaspar. Michael and Gary work with the same mission organization: Operation Mobilization. I recommend this book to anyone. Be cautioned: you will probably cry. I know that because I do not often cry and this book caused me to weep.

I would love to hear from any of you who have read this book. Thanks, Jesse

Book Review – No Compromise: The Life Story of Keith Green


Melody Green and David Hazard, No Compromise: The Life Story of Keith Green (Eugene, OR: Harvest House Publishers, 2000), 392 pgs. (Paperback)

After graduating from seminary, I all of a sudden have time to read non-required reading. I started with No Compromise by Melody Green, the wife of the late Keith Green. Keith was one of the most passionate, sincere, poetic, and Spirit-inspired Christian musicians of the past century.

I devoured this book during my free time at camp in Florida last week. I could not put the book down, partly because his life story is so captivating and partly because the book is written in such a readable storytelling format. Melody co-wrote the book with a guy named David Hazard, who I guess is an experienced editor/author.

Keith Green is probably best known for some of the songs he put out, such as “Oh Lord, You’re Beautiful” and “The Easter Song.” He tragically died in a plane crash with two of his young children in 1982. He was only 28 years old.

The book chronicles the life of Keith from the cradle to the grave. He grew up as a child music prodigy, coming close to making it big in the secular music world. When it was evident that his “big break” was not coming, he slid into the hippie-drug movement of the 70’s. His spiritual search led him through every type of Eastern religion, cult, and new age philosophy. He found nothing except psychedelic drug experiences.

Then he came across the words and teachings of Jesus Christ (not organized Christianity, to which he was antagonistic). Over time, the life of Jesus and the message of full forgiveness through the love and sacrifice of Jesus appealed to him as the true way of life. That began a journey of struggling to follow Jesus and make music. He took the non-traditional route of musicians by refusing to charge for concerts or albums. He also took the non-traditional route of Christians by taking people into his home – hitchhikers, pregnant teens, and others who were “down-and-out” with no place to go. As his ministry grew, he and his wife had taken in some 70 people into their “commune” (they had to keep buying and renting more houses in their suburban neighborhood in order to keep providing space for all these people).

His concerts and music were very “in your face.” His talent was good enough to let him rub shoulders with people like Bob Dylan. Fame was at his doorstep. But his heart was to bring the message of God’s love to the world. He would challenge Christians with lyrics such as “How can you be so dead, when you’ve been so well fed? Jesus rose from the dead and you can’t even get out of bed!”

It was a warm Texas evening when Keith went on a joy ride in a plane with some friends. He took two of his children with him, leaving his pregnant wife and an infant child behind. Keith’s plane went down shortly after taking off, killing all 12 people on board. His death was a loss to the world. But Melody shares in the book that after Keith died, the Lord put a verse on her heart: “Unless a grain of wheat falls to the ground and dies, it remains only a single seed. But if it dies, then it produces many seeds.” Keith’s life and legacy spoke to the urgency of God’s good news to the world – that Jesus Christ is the only way to salvation. And salvation is God’s desire for every human on this earth – so those in the fold need to go out and tell the world about God’s love for them. He wanted to please God, help the needy, and be Christ to the world. Though he wasn’t perfect (he didn’t claim to be), God used him in mighty ways.

The book itself is a mixture of narrative, song lyrics, and journal entries from Keith’s personal journal. Many characters show up in the story, but Melody keeps the reader on track when plotting through his life story. In many ways, the book is about Melody and her own personal spiritual struggles and journey. She lost a husband and two children, so the telling of this story is just as much hers as it is Keith’s. She ends the book with an epilogue that updates the reader on how things are going in her life currently (the edition I read updated the reader up to 1987). I believe there is an edition out for the year 2000 or 2001. She may have another update in that one.

Please read this book. Brace yourself for quite a ride. You will not want to live life the same after reading this book. One of my favorite parts is when Melody shares about Keith’s “ahah” moment when reading the sermons of Charles Finney. He had a midnight encounter with the Holy Spirit while reading these sermons. He was so excited that he ran through his commune at 5 or 6 in the morning to wake everybody up and tell them about the wonderful love of God and the powerful move of the Holy Spirit that he experienced. That began a commune-wide revival that included prayer, sharing, communal confessions, worship and teaching. Hey, sounds like the church in Acts 2 if you ask me.

I wish there were more pictures in the book. I also wish Melody would have shared the “song story” (which she tells many) of “Song for Josiah.” But that is my personal preference since I love that song (it is written to his son shortly after Josiah was born). There’s more I could ramble about, but as they would say in Reading Rainbow back in the 80’s, “why don’t you see for yourself…”

By the way, I looked around on google and youtube and there are some great videos of Keith Green. Here are the best ones I could find:

“Your Love Broke Through”: The Life Story of Keith Green, narrated by Toby Mac

Performance of “Your Love Broke Through” on the 700 Club

Performance of “Asleep in the Light” at a Christian Music Festival

Teaching on “Devotions or Devotion”

Here is the official website for Last Days Ministries, the ministry started by Keith and Melody:

www.keithgreen.com or www.lastdaysministries.org (the same website)

The book can be found and purchased for less than $11 at Amazon.com by clicking here

Lake Placid, FL

I just got back from a great summer camp in Lake Placid, FL. I had the priviledge of sharing the gospel through juggling for a group of kids from various Nazarene churches from central Florida (Tampa, Orlando, and between). God really moved on Thursday night when we put forth an invitation for the kids to make a decision to follow Jesus Christ. I was reading the book, No Compromise (the biography of Keith Green written by his surviving wife, Melody) in my free time during the camp. In the book, Melody talks about how Keith learned to just proclaim the good news and then “get out the way” so God could work in the hearts of people. I tried to follow that example and not get in the way of the Lord’s work. Many children came forward with genuine hearts to respond to the love of Jesus. Praise God!

Thankfully, each child had loving counselors that got to know them throughout the week, so I asked the kids to find their counselor and pray with that person during this time. I know that the Christian life is not just raising your hand or coming forward during an “altar call.” But that is one way (out of many) that serves as a starting point of the path of the cross.

I might be a juggler. But this is what it is all about – bearing news that is good, true, and wonderful. News that God is love and that our old lives are made new through the power of the resurrection of His Son, Jesus Christ.

Ninja Juggling


This post is pure fun. My friend, Duke Holbrook, and I ventured out to Triangle Park in Lexington, KY this past Tuesday for some juggling. But this was no ordinary juggling. This was “ninja juggling.” There is a strict dress code for ninja juggling – all black. Duke recommended that we not don the black headgear, as we might draw some unnecessary attention from the authorities.

We met at 9pm. He was on time, but to my demise, I was a few minutes late. Ninjas must be punctual you know. But Duke seemed OK with my tardiness. He’s used to it. I was late this time because my wife wanted some 6-filter ionized biodegradable pure raw vegan water from the health food store. So I filled up the three jugs, got some other groceries, paid my dues at the cash register, and finally made it to ninja juggling.

The ninja juggler appears at the park, and then disappears. The prop of choice is the LED lighted beanbag. These are soft juggling balls with some very bright battery-powered lights. They leave streaks in the sky when you juggle them.

Duke and I did some individual juggling with 3, 4, and 5 balls each. Then we did some passing of 7, 8, and even an attempt at 9 between the two of us. We drew some onlookers, mostly college students roaming around with nothing else to do but watch two black silhouettes-of-men toss some colorful balls into the air.

The interesting thing about ninja juggling is that what is impressive during the daytime is not impressive at night. That means that we can execute all sorts of neat juggling tricks (like under the leg and behind the back) that have absolutely no “wow” factor in the dark (because you can’t really see body moves). What really shows up in ninja juggling are simple patterns with lots of swinging and twirling of the balls in fast motions. Basically, whatever leaves streaks looks cool.

And it was in a streak that Duke and I left. We came, we juggled, we ninja-ed, and we split. And the authorities never got close to us. I’m out.

www.jessethejuggler.com